Portland Housing Market Forecast: What’s ahead for 2022?

After meeting with lenders, title companies, and, just this week, The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis, I have a few important takeaways that all buyers, sellers, homeowners, and investors should know about what is likely to come in 2022 in the Portland housing market. So, what should we expect?

Buyer demand will continue as home loan interest rates rise

If you are looking to purchase a home in the Portland Metro area in 2022, expect that you will still be competing against a lot of other qualified buyers in order to get in contract on a home. Now, you may be thinking: “But I heard rates are going up? Won’t that slow down the market?” Yes, rates are already ticking up and are currently averaging about 3.5% this week. However, the housing shortage is what is really leading to the demand. So, while rates are not as favorable as they have been for the last few years, they are right around where they were pre-pandemic (and we thought those were great rates then!). If you can buy your next home before 2023, you may still get a loan with a rate under 4% but if inflation increases and the Federal Reserve does not return to buying mortgage backed securities—something they did during the pandemic for the first time ever—expect interest rates to continue to slowly creep up year after year for a bit of time. Historically speaking, we have all become used to these rockbottom rates but it isn’t the norm and it likely won’t continue indefinitely.

Sale prices will increase but not as fast as in 2021

Do not interpret that to mean sales will be flat or decline. Oregon Economists are predicting an 8-11% annual increase in home prices over the next year and then 3-4% in 2023. However, with the raise in rates, buyers will have less purchasing power which may result in a slowing of price hikes. It’s also really hard—not to mention unsustainable—to see 17% growth year over year. 11% more next year is probably still more than you want to pay but it may make the market a little more tolerable for first time buyers. Sellers: your home will still see a lot of equity gains this year but be reasonable when you list. Listen to a pricing expert and do not overprice your home when you go to market.

Fewer vacation properties will be bought and sold after April

Effective April 1, the interest rates on second homes will be comparable to non-owner occupied (investment) properties, meaning they will be significantly higher. However, down payment requirements will remain the same. We saw a lot of homes being purchased and sold in secondary markets on the coast and at lakes during the height of the pandemic due to the perfect storm of work from home realities, a rise in American wealth, and low interest rates. But as we approach spring, expect that that buying appetite may begin to slow as folks contemplating a beach condo or lake side cottage think twice when considering the increased monthly payment.

Rents will also rise and keep pace or exceed mortgages

When folks ask “are we in a bubble?” there are a lot of factors that I explain which essentially lead tot he answer “Not likely.” But one big one is that rents are outpacing or staying on par with mortgages. At the end of the day a roof over your head is just that, which means potential homebuyers who can qualify for a loan are willing to pay in a mortgage what they will pay in rental income. After all, with few exceptions, owning a home is generally more advantageous than renting.

Condos and townhomes will become more of a seller’s market than in recent years

Many well qualified buyers who are tired of being outbid on a single family home, may begin to consider the townhome or condo market. After all, there is 2.5 months inventory of condos as opposed to less than half of a month in single family homes. And, sellers take note: condo inventory has shrunk in recent months as well which is making it a much better time to sell if you are thinking of moving on. Additionally, buying a single family under $500,000 in many Portland neighborhoods is becoming nearly impossible but is very approachable when considering attached or condo style homes, making them a solid investment and home for someone who values location and condition over lot, size, and independent walls.

Big takeaways

It’s not getting cheaper for buyers here in Portland and our housing stock is limited. We need to build more—likely increasing density and building upward—if we want to decrease the housing shortage. Rock bottom interest rates are probably a thing of the recent past but they are not so high yet that it should prevent buyers from purchasing a home. Sellers: it is still a great time to sell to unlock all the equity in your home by selling but be sure to price aggressively rather than overshoot the market—a hot market does not mean buyers will pay anything if they don’t perceive that your home deserves it. Overall, 2022 looks to be another busy year in real estate!

If you have questions about what is to come, please reach out; I am always happy to help!

 

How We are Handling the Second Wave of COVID-19

November 16, 2020 Update

As we all know, COVID-19 is on the rise in Oregon and Governor Brown has instituted a statewide freeze.  At Inhabit, we are committed to keeping the health and safety of our clients and agents at the forefront of everything we do.  Strict office policies are in place to ensure a safe work environment.  We also updated all of our client engagement protocols so the health and safety of our clients come first.  Last March, we launched our Couch Concierge service that brings the entire home buying and selling process to our clients.  Everything from virtual open houses, live video showings with our agents, to virtual contracts and closings.

Here is a recap of how we continue to tailor and improve our services during COVID-19:

Our sellers shouldn’t worry about canceled open houses.  We will create a digital marketing campaign that brings your house to potential buyers all without risking anyone’s health or safety.  Our agents will tailor a showing plan that you feel the most comfortable with.

We have a lot of active buyers right now.  To short-list property options, we offer live video tours.  Your agent will walk you through the property showing you every nook and cranny with honest feedback on quality or construction issues they see– all from the safety of your home.   

In-person tours of your “must-see” homes are still an option in most cases when necessary, but with precautions we take very seriously.  Our agents are following the recommended 6 ft of social distancing, mask-wearing, and strict hand-washing and disinfecting policies.  We will not show homes to anyone that has cold or flu symptoms or has had any exposure to COVID-19 within 2 weeks of the showing.  As your agent, we promise you the same courtesy and will pair you with another Inhabit team member to safely show you the home if we are under the weather or are concerned about personal exposure.  Your agent will provide our COVID-19 Safe Showing Policies for your review prior to visiting any property in-person so you can make the best decision for your health and safety.

As a small business, we put the care of our clients and agents first.  We are all in this together. We promise to use integrity and knowledge as our guiding force.

Here’s to peace, health, and prosperity for all of us in the coming months.

Eric 

Meet Our Founder

Our fearless leader, Eric Hagstette, is this month’s cover feature in Portland Real Producers Magazine.  Click the magazine image below to see the full article and learn what motivates this great guy.

 

Here’s the transcript of the article:

Eric Hagstette’s social conscience is one of his strongest driving forces. Owner and principal broker of Inhabit Real Estate, Eric is this month’s Top Producer.

Starting his career in business to business sales for a Fortune 300 New York-based company, Eric transitioned into real estate in 2005. He looks back on his time in Corporate America with gratitude and appreciation for teaching him the fundamentals of sales, marketing, and most important, follow-up. “This is where I also learned that excuses are…just that,” Eric explains.

As a longtime Portlander, Eric is passionate about our city and how it is being affected by the pandemic, wildfires and smoke, protests, riots, and the current political divide. When asked how the wild ride of 2020 has affected his business, he told us, “Big question. The big picture crises we’re facing are much bigger than our work. They are more important than selling real estate, and we’re right in the heart of all of it. ‘Home’ has never been more important and we are in the business of ‘home.’ I feel torn between all of the hardships resulting from COVID-19 and the abundance that real estate is providing as a result of these unprecedented times. Transactionally speaking, we are in the right place at the right time… there is no shortage of business. Portland has certainly seen its day in the news through all of this and the long-term effect on our business is hard to predict. One of the silver linings of all of these things, from my observation, is a galvanization of the brokerage community. From COVID-19 to wildfires (and everything in between), I’ve seen brokers work together like never before. Kudos to all of you. Thank you.”

Real estate brings with it many rewards. For Eric, one of the biggest rewards comes in the form of the various relationships he has been able to foster over the years. “Hands down it’s all about the people. Not just my clients but my colleagues, my team, my mentors, my co-op agents, my vendors, our neighbors.”

Eric also finds fulfillment in owning and managing Inhabit Real Estate. “Operationally, managing a residential real estate brokerage while simultaneously running my personal sales business allows me to wear all the hats. From coaching my agents to prospecting for business, writing copy for ads, working on budgets and business plans, and everything in between. And who doesn’t love houses, photography, interior design, architecture, marketing, continuing education, networking, and all the fun stuff? Of course, our job also comes with all the tough stuff like unpredictable market conditions, challenging clients, paying taxes, delivering bad news, the emotional roller coaster of real estate, and the woes of being self-employed.

Luckily, my attention span helps me thrive in this multi-tasking, fast-paced, up-and-down market. I honestly love all of it.”

Finding passion in all of the possibilities that real estate affords, motivates Eric on a daily basis. “I have always been passionate about the unlimited possibilities that a real estate license affords us. With hard work and a simple plan, the sky’s the limit for REALTORS®. Playing such a pivotal role in times of transition for my clients is a huge responsibility. I have always held the importance of this piece with passion and drive. As a brokerage owner, I am passionate about teaching, training, and watching my brokers achieve their goals and dreams through real estate.”

Eric’s biggest reward in life is his family. Due to the pandemic, Eric has spent more time at home with his family than at any other time in his professional career and for him, this has been a huge blessing. “My family is the driving force behind my success. Not only do they motivate me every day but, as many of you know, to support the life of a REALTOR® requires a special family support unit. My family rides the roller coaster right by my side and they provide a safe haven to escape to. I’ve been married to my wife Kim for 21 years. I thank my lucky stars every day that our paths crossed. Not only is she my life partner, but she’s also my business partner and co-owner of Inhabit Real Estate, all the while holding down the fort at home and running her award-winning interior design business. We have two amazing teenagers who keep me in check and make sure I’m as ‘woke’ as possible for an almost-50-year- old dad. I learn a ton from my kids. I have so much hope for the younger generations who know more about equality, acceptance, and non-judgment. We can all take a note from the kids of today and appreciate their fire and passion, their resilience and brilliance, and their endurance through these unusual times. And, by way of osmosis and exposure (to me), my family knows more about oil tanks, sewer lines, multiple offers, and even the value of off-street parking.”

Along with the rewards of real estate comes the challenges. This year has been trying for everyone. The devastation from wildfires and the loss of life and business upheaval caused by the pandemic is horrific. We asked Eric what new challenges he has been facing and navigating since the pandemic hit and he told us, “Wildfires, extremely hazardous air quality, political unrest, social outcry and one of the most significant Presidential elections in history, all the while keeping pace with one of the busiest markets I have experienced in 15+ years of selling real estate. The erosion of affordable housing in Portland is accelerating at light speed and this is an indirect challenge that we cannot turn a blind eye to. The pandemic, wildfires, and the election will be in our rear-view mirror in the not-too-distant future, but not addressing the homeless crisis will likely have the greatest future impact on Portland livability and the bottom line of our business.”

Eric has a competitive side that he feeds with his love of cycling and bike racing. He has loved bikes since he was a child and has been racing for the past 10 years. “I’m a die-hard cyclist and bike racer. I love carbon, clicky pedals, training, going fast, and Lycra (yep, I said it…I love Lycra). Cycling keeps my body fit and my mind sane. It feeds my competitive spirit and, unintentionally, is a huge part of my networking sphere. My relationship with my teammates and fellow cycling friends is based on trust and trust is the foundation of our profession so these things go hand in hand.”

The Hagstette family are water enthusiasts. If there is water, you will find them nearby or right in it! “My family loves the water. We have a floating home and spend the summer paddleboarding, kayaking, floating, boating, swimming, and fishing.”

As you would expect, with his strong social conscience Eric does not just think about the changes that need to take place. He helps facilitate the change. Annually, Inhabit Real Estate picks a charitable cause that focuses on alleviating homelessness, “We have thrown hammers for Habitat for Humanity, organized holiday toy drives, and collected much-needed essentials for homeless children and families. As a family, our focus is on Transition Projects. Every month for the last few years, we have prepared and served dinner and lunches at multiple locations that are focused on men, women, and families transitioning out of homelessness.” Eric also aids the community by coaching youth swimming and sponsoring free junior bike racing at The Portland Trophy Cup Cyclocross series.

In closing, we asked Eric if he would like to communicate anything additional to the readers of Portland Real Producers magazine. Without hesitation, he responded, “As a longtime Portlander, I’ve always held a special place in my heart for this amazing city. I am sure I am not alone when I say that Portland is at a very important crossroads. ‘Home’ is our business and we’re paid to sell the ‘Portland experience.’ ‘Home’ doesn’t just apply to our qualified buyers and sellers. It applies to all people occupying the space called Portland including those with the means to buy or rent real estate and those that are sleeping outside under tarps. We must realize that even though we only serve a portion of Portland residents, they all make up the community, whether they have a house or not. It is our duty as ‘real producers’ and leaders in our industry to help Portland through these growing pains. While the country seems to grow in divide, it is very important for us to come together to put Portland back on track to be the darling of the Northwest. As we buzz through town enjoying the fruits of this market, I encourage you to think more critically about the ‘in your face’ issues that are easy to turn a blind eye to: mental illness, drug addiction, systemic racism, climate change, and environmental destruction and affordable housing. Raise your voice and vote. We must demand more from our local leadership and lean hard on them to properly address these big issues which not only affect our profession but our lives as well.

 

 

Something to Look Forward to this Summer in PDX

This is a blog post I have looked forward to writing!  It’s all about simple pleasures these days.  Sauvie Island, for most Portlanders, evokes a special feeling.  It’s a short 10 miles from downtown, but crossing the Sauvie Island bridge and seeing sprawling farmland crowned by the four cascade mountain view (yes, on clear days you can see the top of Mt. Rainier too)–makes you exhale immediately.  For some it’s biking, beach combing, fishing, kayaking or hiking, but the collective draw is the farms.  Picking berries, stone fruit and flowers, hayrides, summer concerts, sipping wine and beer while dining on food cart delicacies and leaving with food grown by hardworking local farmers.  Summer isn’t complete in Portland without a day on Sauvie Island.

This year I had the ultimate pleasure of helping very dear friends of mine realize their dream of owning a farm on Sauvie Island. It was a complicated and emotional transaction for all, but the end result was relieved and happy clients!  Kruger’s Farm is now owned by an amazing local Sauvie Island family and has been renamed Topaz Farm.  Kat and Jim are two of the smartest, hardworking people I know and their vision for the farm is going to blow your mind.  Think farm-to-plate brunches and dinners, sipping wine, beer, local coffee or strawberry rhubarb lemonade while shopping in the farm store that features their own produce, as well as other Sauvie Island and local products.  They have in-house chefs that create pasta, kale chips, pastries, pies, sandwiches, otter pops, etc., for the farm store using their produce.  They use organic farming practices and plan to be an educational farm.  They’ve partnered with the Sauvie Island Center to create camp and field trip opportunities for our schools.  They are creating a bee wheel garden (the first of its kind on the west coast) and have all kinds of plans for future enrichment programs.  They’ve accomplished all this just since they purchased the farm in January.  Can you imagine what the future holds?!!

Of course COVID-19 has changed a few things, but visiting a farm and getting outside isn’t one of them.  Don’t we all need a change of scenery!  There are some things that are on hold right now and Topaz Farm is following a very strict COVID-19 policy to keep their customers and employees safe.  Follow them on Instagram or Facebook to stay up-to-date on berry picking calendars, farm-to-plate dinners and possibly a creative summer concert series.

When you visit Topaz Farm you will likely meet the whole family.  Their daughters Maggie and Odessa work right alongside of their parents.  Kat’s brother, Peter is working tirelessly to build all sorts of new farm features (clever mobile farm store displays, new pens for the animals, etc).  I know they will be pleased to make your acquaintance (tell ‘em we sent ya!)

My wife and I had the pleasure of visiting the farm on opening day, May 27th.  Enjoy some of the photos from our visit.

       

 

COVID-19 Update from Inhabit’s Owner

March 31, 2020

The coronavirus is impacting everyone and every business in some way and the real estate industry is no exception.  In many ways we are lucky because our shift to doing things virtually isn’t as big a leap as some businesses are facing.  As a matter of fact, for many years we’ve been able to handle most of the home buying and selling transactions electronically.  During the COVID-19 pandemic, Inhabit is committed to keeping the health and safety of our clients and agents at the forefront of everything we do.  Even before Governor Brown initiated Oregon’s shelter-in-place order, Inhabit launched our Couch Concierge service that brings the entire home buying and selling process to our clients.  Everything from virtual open houses, live video showings with our agents, to virtual contracts and closings.

Our listing clients shouldn’t worry about canceled open houses.  We will create a digital marketing campaign that brings your house to potential buyers all without risking anyone’s health or safety.  Our agents will tailor a showing plan that you feel the most comfortable with.

For our buyers, we are hosting live video tours.  Our agents will walk you through the property showing you every nook and cranny with honest feedback on quality or construction issues they see.  

In-person tours are still an option in many cases when necessary, but with precautions we take very seriously.  We recommend live video tours for anyone that has cold or flu symptoms or concerned about a possible COVID-19 exposure.  This goes for clients, as well as, agents.  Our agents are following the recommended 6 ft of social distancing and strict hand-washing and disinfecting policies.  Our agents provide our COVID-19 Safe Showing policies to clients for review prior to visiting any property in-person so you can make the best decision for your health and safety.

We are a small business that puts the care of our clients and agents first.  I started this company six years ago because I knew there was a better, more innovative way to serve clients.  This is an industry that one-size definitely does not fit all.  Inhabit has always been forward-looking and our size allows us to be nimble in creating services that address changing needs and goals.  We are here to give you the best real estate advice possible, now and into the future.

Yours in health and prosperity!

Eric

How Your Home Can Provide Stability

For those of us invested in the stock market, we’ve all been wondering if the historic run of this bull market was ever going to end.  No one, however, could have predicted the coronavirus or imagine its global impact. The next few months are still unwritten and as we brace ourselves for how far reaching the effects will be.  It’s unsettling for everyone. The stock market volatility is reminiscent of 2008, but the cause is totally different, and it will have different effects. A recent New York Times article titled Buying a Home During a Pandemic reflected on the 2008 market by saying, “Many real estate shoppers were trying to weigh multiple moving pieces back in late 2008. That crisis was different — the S&P 500 would ultimately lose half its value from its peak, and home prices cratered, too. That’s not the case this time (so far, at least). And what has happened since 2008 should provide us some comfort right now.”

The article also reflects on the stability of the housing market versus the instability of the rental market.  There is some piece of mind knowing that you can capitalize on historically low interest rates to lock in a monthly payment that won’t change.  This is making home ownership much more attractive than renting in many cases.  

The news around COVID-19 feels surreal right now with everything seemingly in a holding pattern, but the root cause of what’s driving Portland’s housing demand will not be affected in the long run.  Portland is one of the strongest real estate markets in the country. It’s during times of crisis that people take the time to reflect on what’s really important. The certainty of having a safe place to call home tops most lists.  Also, the push to create a stay-at-home economy makes where you live more important than ever. Companies may realize that having their employees work from home has some financial benefits. This could very well make a shift to more people getting to decide where they want to live.  Lifestyle is a major driver to Portland’s growth. Are we now poised more than ever to see accelerated growth? I don’t have a crystal ball, but I would be willing to make a bet that the net effect of what’s happening right now will make people pause and consider what’s really important in life.

We have a unique situation with interest rates at historic lows and Portland housing demand still high.  With all the stock market volatility, finding some stability with a large asset like homeownership should be a consideration.  Whatever is important to you, there are options. You can refinance to lock in a lower monthly payment. You can upgrade your home and with the low interest rates end up paying close to what you are now.  You can downsize to streamline your finances and put money away to safeguard yourself against any future volatility. If you are a renter, you can give yourself more certainty by purchasing a home, locking in a monthly payment and having piece of mind that your dollars are going towards an investment for your future.

Whatever is important to you, please know that my team at Inhabit Real Estate is here to help you navigate your decision-making process.  We pride ourselves on being advisors, not salespeople. Let us help you find a strategy that works in your best interest. We are all in this together!

2020 PDX Real Estate Outlook from Inhabit’s Owner Eric Hagstette

Settle in as Eric Pulls Back the Curtain on 2020 Portland Real Estate

And just like that, it’s February 2020. If someone asked you when you were a kid what you thought 2020 would look like, did you picture this? I visualized space travel, robots, flying cars, lasers and futuristic stuff…not this everyday adulty life gig.

So where the heck did January go? To be honest, the reason my annual market outlook is so delayed is because this January was super busy for the Portland market. Now that I think about it, we were even selling houses right through the holidays as well. Portland may be experiencing growing pains, but the real estate market is alive and flourishing.

Last Year’s Prediction: Nailed it! 

A year ago, I was calling for our buyers and investor clients to get into the market. It was a year of opportunity for our buyer clients after many years of seller-favored, tight inventory conditions. For the first time in a long while, buyers enjoyed shopping the market without urgency & pressure, having more than one house to choose from, price drops, seller incentives, and contingent offers. How sweet it was! Instead of calling it a buyer’s market or a seller’s market, we called it a “broker’s market” as we could make both sides happy by creating win/win transactions for our clients. We could place our buyers in homes without real estate “whiplash” and our sellers were walking away from the closing table with a smile on their face excited to move on in the market. It was a unique time. Everyone was pretty happy. I hope that you or someone you know took advantage of it. 

2020 Current Conditions

The Portland market has always been nimble and this year is no exception. It changed quickly! Midway through  Q4 of 2019, Portland inventory started to dwindle down. Furthermore, most sellers don’t list during the winter and holiday months, so market inventory continued to fall. Despite the BRUTAL Portland weather this winter, the buyers came out of the holidays with a big appetite and gobbled up what was left on the market. The close in Portland neighborhoods currently sit at 1.3 months of housing inventory (in the 450k-700k range).  So the 2020 cycle begins with a fiery combination of low housing inventory, great interest rates, a seemingly healthy economy (with many new jobs coming to Portland) and a rapid erosion of affordability (this pushes buyers further from town to seek more affordable options). The market is behaving accordingly in response to high demand. Demand is being driven to Portland by a combination of reasons: jobs/economy, lifestyle, climate & natural resources, and an affordable option for many West Coast transplants. 

2020 Outlook

Welp….it’s an election year which has a tendency to slow the market. Buyers and sellers that aren’t being pushed into the market tend to sit tight through election times out of fear of the unknown. However, the upcoming election doesn’t seem to be having an impact on the market…yet.  Portland shows resilience when other markets slow. When things have slowed for us in the past, we bounce back quickly (including the recession). Thanks to our urban growth boundary and natural geographic barriers, we don’t have sprawl which has been a saving grace for our unique market. Portland offers jobs plus lifestyle and attracts a wide demographic spectrum of folks looking to call Portland home.  Pair this with a mild climate and abundant natural resources and you have a winner. Therefore, I predict 2020 will continue its low-inventory trend which favor sellers, drives prices and frustrates buyers. We have to be careful with the “drives prices” part though.  Affordability is a major concern. The chasm between the cost of Portland real estate and our median household income seems to be growing. Jobs are coming but wages haven’t caught up and the cost of living keeps climbing. This pushes buyers to outlier markets (Vancouver, Milwaukie, Beaverton, Oregon City, etc). For the urbanites that don’t want to pay for the high priced houses but want to stay in town, they’ll drive demand in the ‘attached’ market (townhouses/condos) which had a slow 2019. This will stabilize pricing in the attached market. Properly priced, well-presented, detached houses from the $200k to $1m range will continue to fly off the shelf. The $1m-$1.5m market is a ‘move up’ market for many wanting to upgrade from their existing home .  This market presents opportunities for buyers to make a great purchase; however, tapping their “trapped equity” from their existing home in order to make this purchase can present challenges (certainly not insurmountable but can be daunting to the client). In surprising fashion, Portland’s upper end market ($1.5m +) is moving at a pace you may find interesting (fast). Of course, these properties need to deliver the full package to fetch the price, but this market segment seems very confident in Portland as a place to make these big purchases. I find these big numbers surprising as I clearly remember how freaked out I was when I bought my first house in Mt. Tabor for $185k. However, like many other places, we are bursting at the seams. The numbers for incoming population growth are staggering which in real estate economics translates to demand. Portland is in high demand which has all but diminished the lower end of the market and made it feel normal to buy and sell very expensive real estate. 

Natural disaster or other non-natural market forces aside, Portland real estate has a very promising future and has always been well-insulated. With all this said, if our local government doesn’t figure out a way to better manage our addiction/mental health/homelessness crisis, Portland may lose its reputation as the “darling” of the Pacific Northwest and no matter how great this city is, many people will choose different markets to call home. Rainy weather is tolerable but corruption and greed are inexcusable especially with what it costs to live here. 

2020 Buzz Words & New Concepts 

iBuyer: Also known as institutional buyers or residential REIT (real estate investment trust): Have you heard the OpenDoor commercials on the radio? iBuyer or ‘instant offer’ is easily the biggest new disruptor in real estate and Inhabit is all over it. iBuyers have come into the market backed by billions of venture capital funds and are buying up real estate that fits in their “buy box”. Homeowners that qualify for an instant offer (and choose to take it), are typically taking a discounted price for the convenience and avoiding the traditional selling route.  As a student of change, I became very intrigued with iBuyer and became certified as an iRep Professional. Our philosophy with iBuyer is “pro-consumer choice”…what works best for our clients. iBuyers are real in today’s market and we want to share all of the options with our clients so they get the most out of their real estate assets. It works for some clients and we can show you how. 

Trapped equity: Many homeowners who have owned their real estate for 5 + years are sitting on a decent amount of equity that is trapped in their real estate. In a tight market, trapped equity can add challenges to a buyer that wants to move up or move down within the market. We’ve found that many people will simply opt out of moving around in the market simply because of the perceived risks and challenges with using the equity in your home to help achieve the daunting buy/sell or sell/buy. There are more layers, but we manage these all the time. In the end, our clients say that it’s worth the effort. 

Concierge real estate services: It is more important than ever for real estate professionals to be a trusted advisor not only throughout the sale, but on an ongoing basis after the sale. Realtors are on the front line of clients’ needs as a sale closes. Concierge real estate service continues after closing where Realtors continue to provide useful resources, information and advice on an ongoing basis. In today’s demanding and competitive market, we are reinforcing our value by continuing to support our clients on all things real estate. 

Final Words

Even though we’re not living in the Jetson-like society that I envisioned as a kid, 2020 is chock full of new and exciting stuff: self-parking, electric cars, virtual reality, and an impressive (and concerning) amount of technology & connectivity. At the push of a button, you can have almost anything you want delivered to your doorstep within hours.  Heck, you can push a button and order up a random Realtor to open up a house for you (but how dare you do that!). Real estate is no exception to the expectation of today’s “now society”. As professionals, our response time must be faster, our knowledge deeper and our ability to navigate this market must be sharp and focused. One thing that technology can’t change, is the human factor that is necessary to create happy buyers and happy sellers in real estate transactions. This is our wheelhouse. We embrace today’s disruptions & technology and use them as tools to enhance our clients’ position and experience; however, we feel more strongly than ever that real estate is a people business and we are here to stay. 

Thank you for your continued support and trust. Here’s to a prosperous 2020!

Eric

41st Annual Duniway Holiday Home Tour

The Duniway Holiday Home Tour and Artisan Boutique is back for the 41st year as Portland’s longest-running house-hopping extravaganza.

The one-day event is Friday, December 6, starting at Duniway Elementary school, 7700 SE Reed College Place, Portland.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the students of Duniway Elementary by providing an arts program, cultural development and other academic enrichments.

The Duniway PTA and gracious members of the community offer 6 outstanding homes to explore.  All homes are special and certain to spark nostalgia, inspiration and warm holiday spirit. 

This year’s tour features a Mediterranean-style home brimming with an astounding collection of Pop Art and expertly curated Native American art.  Other homes include an eclectic vintage-inspired Colonial, and a newly remodeled estate.  The six homes offer a diverse array of architecture, landscaping and design: from classic to eclectic, and all the gorgeous styles between.

Nothing enhances a home tour like shopping! The Duniway Artisan Boutique is set to provide all your gift-giving needs. Browse dozens of local vendors in the Duniway Elementary gymnasium for locally made crafts, home goods and treats.  Purchase a unique bag or tote made from repurposed material and fill it with handcrafted jewelry, Oregon honey, handmade pasta and soap. Other vendors offer home goods such as special holiday ornaments and eco-friendly laundry products. 

From the school, participants can board the complimentary trolley to any of the gorgeous Eastmoreland homes whose residents have opened their doors to benefit Arts education.  The trolley circulates on a loop for participants to house-hop at their leisure.  A collectible brochure provides a brief description of homes on the tour, and homes can be explored in any chosen order.

The annual event offers two sessions throughout the day from 10am-3pm, and 5pm-9pm.  Live music will fill the homes during the evening session.  

Tickets are $35 at the door, or $30 in advance at www.duniwayhometour.org.  Admission to the Artisan Boutique is free, and will be open 9am-7:30pm. Single ticket purchase provides access to the Tour, Trolley and Boutique.